Model: N49° Innisfil 53-21-148

Eye: 49     A:50    DBL: 19    B: 39    TPL: 148    ED: 50
0170 -
0107 -
90 -
Innisfil
Innisfil is a town in Ontario, Canada, located on the western shore of Lake Simcoe in Simcoe County, immediately south of Barrie and 80 kilometres (50 mi) north of Toronto. It has historically been a rural area, but due to being geographically sandwiched in between the high-growth areas of Barrie area and York Region has meant greater residential development in Innisfil.

The name Innisfil comes from the Irish Inis Fáil, an ancient mythological name for Ireland.

The history of Innisfil spans a period in excess of 170 years. The Town was hewn from almost unbroken virgin forests which had been home to the Huron Indians, and was first surveyed in 1820. The area encompassed 68,653 acres (278 km²), including the villages of Allandale, Tollendal, Painswick, Minets Point, and Holly at the time.

The first settlers were the Hewson and Soules families who came by way of the East Holland River and Lake Simcoe to settle at Point Endeavour that they then renamed Hewson's Point (later named Big Bay Point).

The town comprises the communities of Alcona, Simcoe Beach, Alderslea, Barclay, Bear Point, Belle Ewart, Belle Air Beach, Bethesda, Big Bay Point, Big Cedar Point, Cedar Mount, Churchill, Cookstown, De Grassi Point, Fennell, Gilford, Glenhaven Beach, Glenwood Beach, Innisfil Heights, Killarney Beach, Lefroy, Maple Grove, Mooselanka Beach, Nantyr, Nantyr Park, Sandy Cove, Sandycove Acres and Stroud.

Cookstown is a hub of antique specialty stores and outlet shopping, and is known as the antique capital of southern Ontario. Tanger Outlets Cookstown, originally the Cookstown Manufacturers' Outlet Mall, opened in 1995. Cookstown is also known for its annual garage sale called "Wing-Ding" which occurs the first weekend of June every year. The Cookstown Fair is held annually, usually in September.

Cookstown is the birthplace of Emily Murphy, a noted Canadian women's rights activist. In 1916, she became the first woman police magistrate in Alberta, and in the British Empire. She is best known for her contributions to Canadian feminism, specifically to the question of whether women were "persons" under Canadian law.